How to Squirt (and Why It’s Totally Chill If You Can’t)

Despite sex educators, sex journalists (hi!), and Netflix’s Sex Education’s best efforts to demystify human sexuality and fill in the gaps of sex education, there are some very normal things about bodies that are still shrouded in mystery. One of those things on most pleasure-seekers’ lists? Squirting.

« Most people have, at one point, gone to Google to ask ‘how to squirt,’ ‘how to make yourself squirt,’ or ‘what is squirting’ only to leave even more confused, » says sociologist and clinical sexologist Sarah Melancon, Ph.D., with The Sex Toy Collective.

That’s exactly why she and sex educator Lola Dean, who holds the world record for volume squirting – seriously, 1250mL in 25 seconds – are going deep on the subject. Below, they explain what squirting is and how to make yourself squirt, plus whether it’s actually possible for everyone.

So What Is Squirting, Exactly?

Before diving into what squirting is and how to squirt, let’s pause for a quick anatomy lesson. « Vulva-owners have something called a urethral sponge – colloquially known as the G-spot or Skene’s gland – 2 to 3 inches inside the vaginal canal along the front wall, » explains Melancon. Sometimes, when vulva-owners get super-duper aroused, this fills up with fluid. When this fluid expels out of the body through the urethra, that’s squirting. (More on what that fluid is, coming up.)

If you’ve ever found yourself watching XXX-rated footage, you might mistakenly think that every time someone squirts, fluid propels or gushes out of the body. And while that may be the case for some people, « some squirt leaks, drips, streams, or dribbles out of the body, » says Jean. (Related: Is Squirting the Same As Female Ejaculation?)

Is Squirting An Orgasm?

Not exactly. While sometimes squirting is called a « squirting orgasm, » Melancon says that they’re two different experiences and sensations. « While squirting can occur at the exact same time as an orgasm, some people squirt before they orgasm, some after, and some without orgasm at all, » she says. (See: 7 Different Types of Orgasms You Can Have)

While some people say it feels exactly like an orgasm, some say it feels similar (but different), and others don’t actually notice when they’re squirting at all.

For example, Sam B., 34, says she squirts nearly every single time she’s masturbating but only sometimes during partnered sex. « It’s different than an orgasm but still very, very pleasurable, » she says. « Squirting feels like a giant wave of energy leaving my body like a release, while orgasming feels more like an eruption of energy. »

Tucker N., 28, didn’t know they could squirt before dating their current girlfriend. « The only reason I know when I’ve squirted is that my girlfriend tells me I have and the bed is a little wetter after, » they say. « It happens at the same time as an orgasm for me so it’s trickier to tell. » (Related: I Tried Reddit’s Best Sex Advice – Here’s What Worked)

Just Wondering: Is Squirt Pee?

If you’re wondering « how to make yourself squirt, » you might also be interested in whether or not squirt is pee. The answer? No, it is not pee. « The fluid is called prostatic fluid, and has a different biochemical make-up than pee, » says Melancon. While some research suggests that it contains the same compounds (urea and creatinine) as urine, having the same ingredients doesn’t mean they’re the same. « While pee generally has an odor that is yellow in color, squirt is usually white or clear and odorless and mostly tasteless, » she adds.

There isn’t an official way to tell discern between pee and squirt, but if you suspect that you’re peeing during sex (due to the color, odor, or taste of the fluid being released), Melancon recommends chatting with a pelvic health specialist. Why? « If you’re peeing during sex, it could be a sign of urinary incontinence, » she says. Under these circumstances, it’s known as coital incontinence (versus stress incontinence, when you jump, sneeze, etc.) sugardaddymeet – and one 2017 study published in the journal PLoS One suggests that peeing during penetration is somewhat common in vulva-owners (especially those who have given birth). « This condition is often linked with a too-weak or too-tight pelvic floor, which pelvic floor exercises can remedy. » (Related: 5 Things Every Woman Should Know About Her Pelvic Floor)

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